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Texas Progressive Alliance May 14, 2012

May 14, 2012

The Texas Progressive Alliance reminds everyone that early voting has begun as it brings you this week’s blog roundup.

Off the Kuff finished his interview tour of Texas with a conversation with Domingo Garcia in CD33.

BossKitty at TruthHugger will not weigh in, whether or not the truth was actually served in court, when a black lady fired a warning shot into a wall. Firing a gun in irresponsible ways is natural in Texas. But, Florida has contradictory laws that allow courts to pick and choose who gets punished for similar irresponsible behavior. You can decide for yourself how good a job of it they do.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry came to Williamson County this week, he endorsed John Bradley for DA. WCNews at Eye On Williamson has the rest of the story, Birds of a feather.

It was a good week to be gay if you were Barack Obama and John Carona, and a bad week to be gay if you were Mitt Romney and Dan Patrick. And if you think that’s confusing, wait until you read what PDiddie at Brains and Eggs said about Greg Abbott’s rose petals and Joe Arpaio’s pink panties.

Lewisville Texan Journal looks at Republican candidate for HD 106, Pat Fallon’s residence, and addresses whether he committed voter fraud by voting from an address where he apparently did not live.

At TexasKaos, lightseeker asks Could the Education Cuts be the beginning of the End for Texas Republican? Check out the details.

Neil at Texas Liberal endorsed Sean Hubbard in the Democratic primary for the open U.S. Senate seat.

The Week of May 14 in Texas History:

Today in Texas History: Treaty of Velasco signed

On this date in 1836, ad interim president David G. Burnet and Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna signed the Treaties of Velasco, following the Texans’ victory at San Jacinto during the Texas Revolution.

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Two treaties were signed &#151 a public treaty providing for the end of the war, exchanging of prisoners and the safety of Santa Anna; and a secret treaty wherein Santa Anna promised to try to deliver on the conditions of the public treaty.

Both the Texas and the Mexican government, however, violated the treaties and their conflict continued. Mexico did not recognize Texas’ independence, and the Texas boundary was not established until the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed in February 1848, ending the Mexican War.

Texas Germans declare slavery to be evil – May 14, 1854

On this day in 1854, Texas Germans gathered to discuss the national crisis over slavery. At the the annual Staats-Saengerfest (State Singers’ Festival), held on May 14 and 15, delegates from various local political clubs of German citizens in western Texas met in San Antonio and, following the lead of the Freier Mann Verein (Freeman’s Association) organized by fellow Germans in the Northern states, adopted a mildly worded plank declaring that slavery was an evil and that abolition was the business of the states. The resolution went on to maintain that a state should be able to obtain help from the federal government to effect abolition. By “help” the convention meant that the state would ask the federal government to pay the owners for freed slaves. The declaration, along with more strongly worded antislavery newspaper articles in the German language press, led many Anglo-Texans to question the loyalty of their German neighbors on the slavery question, and eventually helped fuel mistrust when Texas joined the Confederacy in 1861.

Leaks notwithstanding, new Capitol dedicated in Austin – May 14, 1888

On this day in 1888 began a week-long celebration dedicating the present Capitol building of Texas. Unfortunately, the Capitol Board refused to accept the structure because its copper roof leaked and because of several other minor problems. After builder Gustav Wilke repaired the roof and made other corrections, the board accepted the building on December 6 of that year.

Related Handbook Articles: CAPITOLWILKE, GUSTAV
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